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Suzuki wins J-WRC

 

The new generation Suzuki Swift has reconfirmed its ability as a top rally car after a convincing display in the recent Rally Great Britain.

Untitled Document Estonian Jan Molder drove a bright yellow Swift hatchback to victory in the Junior World Rally Championship class in the gruelling British event. It was his debut JWRC victory.

As a result of this final round in the series, Suzuki Swifts have taken out three of the top five positions in the 2006 JWRC for the full season.

The season point score saw the highly acclaimed front wheel drive Swift in second, third and fifth positions.

Molder finished almost two minutes ahead of his nearest rival in the British rally after a consistent drive in difficult conditions.

Fellow Suzuki Sport drivers Per-Gunnar Andersson and Guy Wilks started as favourites but hit problems, along with several other front runners.

Torrential rain turned some of the high speed special stages into skating rinks, and the all-gravel event took its toll on cars.

The ninth round in the championship was centred around Cardiff, the capital of Wales, and saw Wilks in second place on the first of the three days.

Wilks seemed poised to win the class and take his first Junior World Rally Championship, only to suffer a transmission problem on the second day.

Andersson suffered a series of punctures which eventually broke the rear suspension on his Swift on the opening day. He recovered to fourth place on day two while Molder had swept his Suzuki into the lead.

Molder was able to retain the number one position on the final day, giving Suzuki JWRC victory in the Rally Great Britain for the fourth successive year. Daniel Carlsson won with a Suzuki Ignis in 2003, and Suzuki's were again victorious in the hands of Wilks and Andersson respectively in 2004 and 2005.

Team principal Nubuhiro "Monster" Tajima said in his 38 years of motor sport involvement he had never seen a day or an event like the Rally Great Britain. "The lead changed so many times that it was really hard to keep up," said Tajima.

The Swift Super 1600s that have been campaigning the world rally series are closely aligned to the production Swift that is one of the most popular small cars sold in New Zealand.

With its low centre of gravity and strong body, the Swift forms the basis of a highly competitive car for motor sport.

Suzuki's motor sport project leader, Ryohei Matsumoto, said he had been delighted with the positive feedback about the standard production Swift's handling, driveability and character. The rally version had these virtues as its foundation, he said.

In rally trim, the Swift's 1.6 litre double overhead camshaft engine produces 160 kW of power and 186 Nm of torque. It uses a six-speed sequential gearbox.

Next year the Junior World Rally Championship kicks off with the Rally of Norway in February 2007.

Estonian Jan Molder drove a bright yellow Swift hatchback to victory in the Junior World Rally Championship class in the gruelling British event. It was his debut JWRC victory.

As a result of this final round in the series, Suzuki Swifts have taken out three of the top five positions in the 2006 JWRC for the full season.

The season point score saw the highly acclaimed front wheel drive Swift in second, third and fifth positions.

Molder finished almost two minutes ahead of his nearest rival in the British rally after a consistent drive in difficult conditions.

Fellow Suzuki Sport drivers Per-Gunnar Andersson and Guy Wilks started as favourites but hit problems, along with several other front runners.

Torrential rain turned some of the high speed special stages into skating rinks, and the all-gravel event took its toll on cars.

The ninth round in the championship was centred around Cardiff, the capital of Wales, and saw Wilks in second place on the first of the three days.

Wilks seemed poised to win the class and take his first Junior World Rally Championship, only to suffer a transmission problem on the second day.

Andersson suffered a series of punctures which eventually broke the rear suspension on his Swift on the opening day. He recovered to fourth place on day two while Molder had swept his Suzuki into the lead.

Molder was able to retain the number one position on the final day, giving Suzuki JWRC victory in the Rally Great Britain for the fourth successive year. Daniel Carlsson won with a Suzuki Ignis in 2003, and Suzuki's were again victorious in the hands of Wilks and Andersson respectively in 2004 and 2005.

Team principal Nubuhiro "Monster" Tajima said in his 38 years of motor sport involvement he had never seen a day or an event like the Rally Great Britain. "The lead changed so many times that it was really hard to keep up," said Tajima.

The Swift Super 1600s that have been campaigning the world rally series are closely aligned to the production Swift that is one of the most popular small cars sold in New Zealand.

With its low centre of gravity and strong body, the Swift forms the basis of a highly competitive car for motor sport.

Suzuki's motor sport project leader, Ryohei Matsumoto, said he had been delighted with the positive feedback about the standard production Swift's handling, driveability and character. The rally version had these virtues as its foundation, he said.

In rally trim, the Swift's 1.6 litre double overhead camshaft engine produces 160 kW of power and 186 Nm of torque. It uses a six-speed sequential gearbox.

Next year the Junior World Rally Championship kicks off with the Rally of Norway in February 2007.

Estonian Jan Molder drove a bright yellow Swift hatchback to victory in the Junior World Rally Championship class in the gruelling British event. It was his debut JWRC victory.

As a result of this final round in the series, Suzuki Swifts have taken out three of the top five positions in the 2006 JWRC for the full season.

The season point score saw the highly acclaimed front wheel drive Swift in second, third and fifth positions.

Molder finished almost two minutes ahead of his nearest rival in the British rally after a consistent drive in difficult conditions.

Fellow Suzuki Sport drivers Per-Gunnar Andersson and Guy Wilks started as favourites but hit problems, along with several other front runners.

Torrential rain turned some of the high speed special stages into skating rinks, and the all-gravel event took its toll on cars.

The ninth round in the championship was centred around Cardiff, the capital of Wales, and saw Wilks in second place on the first of the three days.

Wilks seemed poised to win the class and take his first Junior World Rally Championship, only to suffer a transmission problem on the second day.

Andersson suffered a series of punctures which eventually broke the rear suspension on his Swift on the opening day. He recovered to fourth place on day two while Molder had swept his Suzuki into the lead.

Molder was able to retain the number one position on the final day, giving Suzuki JWRC victory in the Rally Great Britain for the fourth successive year. Daniel Carlsson won with a Suzuki Ignis in 2003, and Suzuki's were again victorious in the hands of Wilks and Andersson respectively in 2004 and 2005.

Team principal Nubuhiro "Monster" Tajima said in his 38 years of motor sport involvement he had never seen a day or an event like the Rally Great Britain. "The lead changed so many times that it was really hard to keep up," said Tajima.

The Swift Super 1600s that have been campaigning the world rally series are closely aligned to the production Swift that is one of the most popular small cars sold in New Zealand.

With its low centre of gravity and strong body, the Swift forms the basis of a highly competitive car for motor sport.

Suzuki's motor sport project leader, Ryohei Matsumoto, said he had been delighted with the positive feedback about the standard production Swift's handling, driveability and character. The rally version had these virtues as its foundation, he said.

In rally trim, the Swift's 1.6 litre double overhead camshaft engine produces 160 kW of power and 186 Nm of torque. It uses a six-speed sequential gearbox.

Next year the Junior World Rally Championship kicks off with the Rally of Norway in February 2007.

Estonian Jan Molder drove a bright yellow Swift hatchback to victory in the Junior World Rally Championship class in the gruelling British event. It was his debut JWRC victory.

As a result of this final round in the series, Suzuki Swifts have taken out three of the top five positions in the 2006 JWRC for the full season.

The season point score saw the highly acclaimed front wheel drive Swift in second, third and fifth positions.

Molder finished almost two minutes ahead of his nearest rival in the British rally after a consistent drive in difficult conditions.

Fellow Suzuki Sport drivers Per-Gunnar Andersson and Guy Wilks started as favourites but hit problems, along with several other front runners.

Torrential rain turned some of the high speed special stages into skating rinks, and the all-gravel event took its toll on cars.

The ninth round in the championship was centred around Cardiff, the capital of Wales, and saw Wilks in second place on the first of the three days.

Wilks seemed poised to win the class and take his first Junior World Rally Championship, only to suffer a transmission problem on the second day.

Andersson suffered a series of punctures which eventually broke the rear suspension on his Swift on the opening day. He recovered to fourth place on day two while Molder had swept his Suzuki into the lead.

Molder was able to retain the number one position on the final day, giving Suzuki JWRC victory in the Rally Great Britain for the fourth successive year. Daniel Carlsson won with a Suzuki Ignis in 2003, and Suzuki's were again victorious in the hands of Wilks and Andersson respectively in 2004 and 2005.

Team principal Nubuhiro "Monster" Tajima said in his 38 years of motor sport involvement he had never seen a day or an event like the Rally Great Britain. "The lead changed so many times that it was really hard to keep up," said Tajima.

The Swift Super 1600s that have been campaigning the world rally series are closely aligned to the production Swift that is one of the most popular small cars sold in New Zealand.

With its low centre of gravity and strong body, the Swift forms the basis of a highly competitive car for motor sport.

Suzuki's motor sport project leader, Ryohei Matsumoto, said he had been delighted with the positive feedback about the standard production Swift's handling, driveability and character. The rally version had these virtues as its foundation, he said.

In rally trim, the Swift's 1.6 litre double overhead camshaft engine produces 160 kW of power and 186 Nm of torque. It uses a six-speed sequential gearbox.

Next year the Junior World Rally Championship kicks off with the Rally of Norway in February 2007.

Estonian Jan Molder drove a bright yellow Swift hatchback to victory in the Junior World Rally Championship class in the gruelling British event. It was his debut JWRC victory.

As a result of this final round in the series, Suzuki Swifts have taken out three of the top five positions in the 2006 JWRC for the full season.

The season point score saw the highly acclaimed front wheel drive Swift in second, third and fifth positions.

Molder finished almost two minutes ahead of his nearest rival in the British rally after a consistent drive in difficult conditions.

Fellow Suzuki Sport drivers Per-Gunnar Andersson and Guy Wilks started as favourites but hit problems, along with several other front runners.

Torrential rain turned some of the high speed special stages into skating rinks, and the all-gravel event took its toll on cars.

The ninth round in the championship was centred around Cardiff, the capital of Wales, and saw Wilks in second place on the first of the three days.

Wilks seemed poised to win the class and take his first Junior World Rally Championship, only to suffer a transmission problem on the second day.

Andersson suffered a series of punctures which eventually broke the rear suspension on his Swift on the opening day. He recovered to fourth place on day two while Molder had swept his Suzuki into the lead.

Molder was able to retain the number one position on the final day, giving Suzuki JWRC victory in the Rally Great Britain for the fourth successive year. Daniel Carlsson won with a Suzuki Ignis in 2003, and Suzuki's were again victorious in the hands of Wilks and Andersson respectively in 2004 and 2005.

Team principal Nubuhiro "Monster" Tajima said in his 38 years of motor sport involvement he had never seen a day or an event like the Rally Great Britain. "The lead changed so many times that it was really hard to keep up," said Tajima.

The Swift Super 1600s that have been campaigning the world rally series are closely aligned to the production Swift that is one of the most popular small cars sold in New Zealand.

With its low centre of gravity and strong body, the Swift forms the basis of a highly competitive car for motor sport.

Suzuki's motor sport project leader, Ryohei Matsumoto, said he had been delighted with the positive feedback about the standard production Swift's handling, driveability and character. The rally version had these virtues as its foundation, he said.

In rally trim, the Swift's 1.6 litre double overhead camshaft engine produces 160 kW of power and 186 Nm of torque. It uses a six-speed sequential gearbox.

Next year the Junior World Rally Championship kicks off with the Rally of Norway in February 2007.

Estonian Jan Molder drove a bright yellow Swift hatchback to victory in the Junior World Rally Championship class in the gruelling British event. It was his debut JWRC victory.

As a result of this final round in the series, Suzuki Swifts have taken out three of the top five positions in the 2006 JWRC for the full season.

The season point score saw the highly acclaimed front wheel drive Swift in second, third and fifth positions.

Molder finished almost two minutes ahead of his nearest rival in the British rally after a consistent drive in difficult conditions.

Fellow Suzuki Sport drivers Per-Gunnar Andersson and Guy Wilks started as favourites but hit problems, along with several other front runners.

Torrential rain turned some of the high speed special stages into skating rinks, and the all-gravel event took its toll on cars.

The ninth round in the championship was centred around Cardiff, the capital of Wales, and saw Wilks in second place on the first of the three days.

Wilks seemed poised to win the class and take his first Junior World Rally Championship, only to suffer a transmission problem on the second day.

Andersson suffered a series of punctures which eventually broke the rear suspension on his Swift on the opening day. He recovered to fourth place on day two while Molder had swept his Suzuki into the lead.

Molder was able to retain the number one position on the final day, giving Suzuki JWRC victory in the Rally Great Britain for the fourth successive year. Daniel Carlsson won with a Suzuki Ignis in 2003, and Suzuki's were again victorious in the hands of Wilks and Andersson respectively in 2004 and 2005.

Team principal Nubuhiro "Monster" Tajima said in his 38 years of motor sport involvement he had never seen a day or an event like the Rally Great Britain. "The lead changed so many times that it was really hard to keep up," said Tajima.

The Swift Super 1600s that have been campaigning the world rally series are closely aligned to the production Swift that is one of the most popular small cars sold in New Zealand.

With its low centre of gravity and strong body, the Swift forms the basis of a highly competitive car for motor sport.

Suzuki's motor sport project leader, Ryohei Matsumoto, said he had been delighted with the positive feedback about the standard production Swift's handling, driveability and character. The rally version had these virtues as its foundation, he said.

In rally trim, the Swift's 1.6 litre double overhead camshaft engine produces 160 kW of power and 186 Nm of torque. It uses a six-speed sequential gearbox.

Next year the Junior World Rally Championship kicks off with the Rally of Norway in February 2007.

Estonian Jan Molder drove a bright yellow Swift hatchback to victory in the Junior World Rally Championship class in the gruelling British event. It was his debut JWRC victory.

As a result of this final round in the series, Suzuki Swifts have taken out three of the top five positions in the 2006 JWRC for the full season.

The season point score saw the highly acclaimed front wheel drive Swift in second, third and fifth positions.

Molder finished almost two minutes ahead of his nearest rival in the British rally after a consistent drive in difficult conditions.

Fellow Suzuki Sport drivers Per-Gunnar Andersson and Guy Wilks started as favourites but hit problems, along with several other front runners.

Torrential rain turned some of the high speed special stages into skating rinks, and the all-gravel event took its toll on cars.

The ninth round in the championship was centred around Cardiff, the capital of Wales, and saw Wilks in second place on the first of the three days.

Wilks seemed poised to win the class and take his first Junior World Rally Championship, only to suffer a transmission problem on the second day.

Andersson suffered a series of punctures which eventually broke the rear suspension on his Swift on the opening day. He recovered to fourth place on day two while Molder had swept his Suzuki into the lead.

Molder was able to retain the number one position on the final day, giving Suzuki JWRC victory in the Rally Great Britain for the fourth successive year. Daniel Carlsson won with a Suzuki Ignis in 2003, and Suzuki's were again victorious in the hands of Wilks and Andersson respectively in 2004 and 2005.

Team principal Nubuhiro "Monster" Tajima said in his 38 years of motor sport involvement he had never seen a day or an event like the Rally Great Britain. "The lead changed so many times that it was really hard to keep up," said Tajima.

The Swift Super 1600s that have been campaigning the world rally series are closely aligned to the production Swift that is one of the most popular small cars sold in New Zealand.

With its low centre of gravity and strong body, the Swift forms the basis of a highly competitive car for motor sport.

Suzuki's motor sport project leader, Ryohei Matsumoto, said he had been delighted with the positive feedback about the standard production Swift's handling, driveability and character. The rally version had these virtues as its foundation, he said.

In rally trim, the Swift's 1.6 litre double overhead camshaft engine produces 160 kW of power and 186 Nm of torque. It uses a six-speed sequential gearbox.

Next year the Junior World Rally Championship kicks off with the Rally of Norway in February 2007.

Estonian Jan Molder drove a bright yellow Swift hatchback to victory in the Junior World Rally Championship class in the gruelling British event. It was his debut JWRC victory.

As a result of this final round in the series, Suzuki Swifts have taken out three of the top five positions in the 2006 JWRC for the full season.

The season point score saw the highly acclaimed front wheel drive Swift in second, third and fifth positions.

Molder finished almost two minutes ahead of his nearest rival in the British rally after a consistent drive in difficult conditions.

Fellow Suzuki Sport drivers Per-Gunnar Andersson and Guy Wilks started as favourites but hit problems, along with several other front runners.

Torrential rain turned some of the high speed special stages into skating rinks, and the all-gravel event took its toll on cars.

The ninth round in the championship was centred around Cardiff, the capital of Wales, and saw Wilks in second place on the first of the three days.

Wilks seemed poised to win the class and take his first Junior World Rally Championship, only to suffer a transmission problem on the second day.

Andersson suffered a series of punctures which eventually broke the rear suspension on his Swift on the opening day. He recovered to fourth place on day two while Molder had swept his Suzuki into the lead.

Molder was able to retain the number one position on the final day, giving Suzuki JWRC victory in the Rally Great Britain for the fourth successive year. Daniel Carlsson won with a Suzuki Ignis in 2003, and Suzuki's were again victorious in the hands of Wilks and Andersson respectively in 2004 and 2005.

Team principal Nubuhiro "Monster" Tajima said in his 38 years of motor sport involvement he had never seen a day or an event like the Rally Great Britain. "The lead changed so many times that it was really hard to keep up," said Tajima.

The Swift Super 1600s that have been campaigning the world rally series are closely aligned to the production Swift that is one of the most popular small cars sold in New Zealand.

With its low centre of gravity and strong body, the Swift forms the basis of a highly competitive car for motor sport.

Suzuki's motor sport project leader, Ryohei Matsumoto, said he had been delighted with the positive feedback about the standard production Swift's handling, driveability and character. The rally version had these virtues as its foundation, he said.

In rally trim, the Swift's 1.6 litre double overhead camshaft engine produces 160 kW of power and 186 Nm of torque. It uses a six-speed sequential gearbox.

Next year the Junior World Rally Championship kicks off with the Rally of Norway in February 2007.

Estonian Jan Molder drove a bright yellow Swift hatchback to victory in the Junior World Rally Championship class in the gruelling British event. It was his debut JWRC victory.

As a result of this final round in the series, Suzuki Swifts have taken out three of the top five positions in the 2006 JWRC for the full season.

The season point score saw the highly acclaimed front wheel drive Swift in second, third and fifth positions.

Molder finished almost two minutes ahead of his nearest rival in the British rally after a consistent drive in difficult conditions.

Fellow Suzuki Sport drivers Per-Gunnar Andersson and Guy Wilks started as favourites but hit problems, along with several other front runners.

Torrential rain turned some of the high speed special stages into skating rinks, and the all-gravel event took its toll on cars.

The ninth round in the championship was centred around Cardiff, the capital of Wales, and saw Wilks in second place on the first of the three days.

Wilks seemed poised to win the class and take his first Junior World Rally Championship, only to suffer a transmission problem on the second day.

Andersson suffered a series of punctures which eventually broke the rear suspension on his Swift on the opening day. He recovered to fourth place on day two while Molder had swept his Suzuki into the lead.

Molder was able to retain the number one position on the final day, giving Suzuki JWRC victory in the Rally Great Britain for the fourth successive year. Daniel Carlsson won with a Suzuki Ignis in 2003, and Suzuki's were again victorious in the hands of Wilks and Andersson respectively in 2004 and 2005.

Team principal Nubuhiro "Monster" Tajima said in his 38 years of motor sport involvement he had never seen a day or an event like the Rally Great Britain. "The lead changed so many times that it was really hard to keep up," said Tajima.

The Swift Super 1600s that have been campaigning the world rally series are closely aligned to the production Swift that is one of the most popular small cars sold in New Zealand.

With its low centre of gravity and strong body, the Swift forms the basis of a highly competitive car for motor sport.

Suzuki's motor sport project leader, Ryohei Matsumoto, said he had been delighted with the positive feedback about the standard production Swift's handling, driveability and character. The rally version had these virtues as its foundation, he said.

In rally trim, the Swift's 1.6 litre double overhead camshaft engine produces 160 kW of power and 186 Nm of torque. It uses a six-speed sequential gearbox.

Next year the Junior World Rally Championship kicks off with the Rally of Norway in February 2007.


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