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Brickbats and bouquets

 

T There was plenty of drama and carnage at the opening round of the national championship motor racing season at Pukekohe.

We had a reasonable weekend in the Exide Toyota in Round 1 of the TRS. We lost our way slightly on Saturday, but ended up sixth for the weekend which was pleasing.

Unfortunately, the meeting was let down by officialdom. In what was one of the most dangerous moves I have ever seen at a racetrack, an official’s vehicle drove the wrong way up pit straight to attend a crash on top of the hill while race cars were still coming down at racing speeds.

Admittedly it was a serious crash, but it didn’t warrant putting every other competitor in danger.

What concerns me is the number, size and inconsistency of fines, sometimes into the many thousands of dollars, which are being handed out for unimportant offences or genuine mistakes.

I can understand being fined for dangerous driving or blatant cheating, but in most cases it is revenue gathering and driving young competitors out of the sport.

It’s hard enough without these ridiculous actions by officials, who should be being fined themselves for not following their own rulebook.

Motorsport has developed into such a professional sport in New Zealand, that it’s time we had some professional officials to run it.
On a happier note, I’ve just returned from the Historic Classic race meeting at Sandown in Melbourne, Australia, which featured a huge field of NZ and Australian Formula 5000 cars racing for the Tasman Cup.

I was invited to attend as part of a reunion of F5000 drivers from the 1970s, and it was fantastic catching up with drivers I haven’t seen for up to 30 years, such as Warwick Brown, John McCormick, Alf Constanzo, Bruce Allison and John Goss.

It was an amazing trip down memory lane when I was given the opportunity to step back into my NZ Grand Prix-winning Lola T332 for a demonstration run on the Sunday. It was the first time I had sat in it since 1977.

The field of F5000s produced an incredible display of sights and sounds that brought the house down.
Such a full field probably hasn’t been seen at Sandown for 30 years, and it’s mainly thanks to the work of the NZ F5000 association, and in particular David Abbott. We’ll have to wait until the new year to see these beasts in action in NZ.



We had a reasonable weekend in the Exide Toyota in Round 1 of the TRS. We lost our way slightly on Saturday, but ended up sixth for the weekend which was pleasing.

Unfortunately, the meeting was let down by officialdom. In what was one of the most dangerous moves I have ever seen at a racetrack, an official’s vehicle drove the wrong way up pit straight to attend a crash on top of the hill while race cars were still coming down at racing speeds.

Admittedly it was a serious crash, but it didn’t warrant putting every other competitor in danger.

What concerns me is the number, size and inconsistency of fines, sometimes into the many thousands of dollars, which are being handed out for unimportant offences or genuine mistakes.

I can understand being fined for dangerous driving or blatant cheating, but in most cases it is revenue gathering and driving young competitors out of the sport.

It’s hard enough without these ridiculous actions by officials, who should be being fined themselves for not following their own rulebook.

Motorsport has developed into such a professional sport in New Zealand, that it’s time we had some professional officials to run it.
On a happier note, I’ve just returned from the Historic Classic race meeting at Sandown in Melbourne, Australia, which featured a huge field of NZ and Australian Formula 5000 cars racing for the Tasman Cup.

I was invited to attend as part of a reunion of F5000 drivers from the 1970s, and it was fantastic catching up with drivers I haven’t seen for up to 30 years, such as Warwick Brown, John McCormick, Alf Constanzo, Bruce Allison and John Goss.

It was an amazing trip down memory lane when I was given the opportunity to step back into my NZ Grand Prix-winning Lola T332 for a demonstration run on the Sunday. It was the first time I had sat in it since 1977.

The field of F5000s produced an incredible display of sights and sounds that brought the house down.
Such a full field probably hasn’t been seen at Sandown for 30 years, and it’s mainly thanks to the work of the NZ F5000 association, and in particular David Abbott. We’ll have to wait until the new year to see these beasts in action in NZ.



We had a reasonable weekend in the Exide Toyota in Round 1 of the TRS. We lost our way slightly on Saturday, but ended up sixth for the weekend which was pleasing.

Unfortunately, the meeting was let down by officialdom. In what was one of the most dangerous moves I have ever seen at a racetrack, an official’s vehicle drove the wrong way up pit straight to attend a crash on top of the hill while race cars were still coming down at racing speeds.

Admittedly it was a serious crash, but it didn’t warrant putting every other competitor in danger.

What concerns me is the number, size and inconsistency of fines, sometimes into the many thousands of dollars, which are being handed out for unimportant offences or genuine mistakes.

I can understand being fined for dangerous driving or blatant cheating, but in most cases it is revenue gathering and driving young competitors out of the sport.

It’s hard enough without these ridiculous actions by officials, who should be being fined themselves for not following their own rulebook.

Motorsport has developed into such a professional sport in New Zealand, that it’s time we had some professional officials to run it.
On a happier note, I’ve just returned from the Historic Classic race meeting at Sandown in Melbourne, Australia, which featured a huge field of NZ and Australian Formula 5000 cars racing for the Tasman Cup.

I was invited to attend as part of a reunion of F5000 drivers from the 1970s, and it was fantastic catching up with drivers I haven’t seen for up to 30 years, such as Warwick Brown, John McCormick, Alf Constanzo, Bruce Allison and John Goss.

It was an amazing trip down memory lane when I was given the opportunity to step back into my NZ Grand Prix-winning Lola T332 for a demonstration run on the Sunday. It was the first time I had sat in it since 1977.

The field of F5000s produced an incredible display of sights and sounds that brought the house down.
Such a full field probably hasn’t been seen at Sandown for 30 years, and it’s mainly thanks to the work of the NZ F5000 association, and in particular David Abbott. We’ll have to wait until the new year to see these beasts in action in NZ.



We had a reasonable weekend in the Exide Toyota in Round 1 of the TRS. We lost our way slightly on Saturday, but ended up sixth for the weekend which was pleasing.

Unfortunately, the meeting was let down by officialdom. In what was one of the most dangerous moves I have ever seen at a racetrack, an official’s vehicle drove the wrong way up pit straight to attend a crash on top of the hill while race cars were still coming down at racing speeds.

Admittedly it was a serious crash, but it didn’t warrant putting every other competitor in danger.

What concerns me is the number, size and inconsistency of fines, sometimes into the many thousands of dollars, which are being handed out for unimportant offences or genuine mistakes.

I can understand being fined for dangerous driving or blatant cheating, but in most cases it is revenue gathering and driving young competitors out of the sport.

It’s hard enough without these ridiculous actions by officials, who should be being fined themselves for not following their own rulebook.

Motorsport has developed into such a professional sport in New Zealand, that it’s time we had some professional officials to run it.
On a happier note, I’ve just returned from the Historic Classic race meeting at Sandown in Melbourne, Australia, which featured a huge field of NZ and Australian Formula 5000 cars racing for the Tasman Cup.

I was invited to attend as part of a reunion of F5000 drivers from the 1970s, and it was fantastic catching up with drivers I haven’t seen for up to 30 years, such as Warwick Brown, John McCormick, Alf Constanzo, Bruce Allison and John Goss.

It was an amazing trip down memory lane when I was given the opportunity to step back into my NZ Grand Prix-winning Lola T332 for a demonstration run on the Sunday. It was the first time I had sat in it since 1977.

The field of F5000s produced an incredible display of sights and sounds that brought the house down.
Such a full field probably hasn’t been seen at Sandown for 30 years, and it’s mainly thanks to the work of the NZ F5000 association, and in particular David Abbott. We’ll have to wait until the new year to see these beasts in action in NZ.



We had a reasonable weekend in the Exide Toyota in Round 1 of the TRS. We lost our way slightly on Saturday, but ended up sixth for the weekend which was pleasing.

Unfortunately, the meeting was let down by officialdom. In what was one of the most dangerous moves I have ever seen at a racetrack, an official’s vehicle drove the wrong way up pit straight to attend a crash on top of the hill while race cars were still coming down at racing speeds.

Admittedly it was a serious crash, but it didn’t warrant putting every other competitor in danger.

What concerns me is the number, size and inconsistency of fines, sometimes into the many thousands of dollars, which are being handed out for unimportant offences or genuine mistakes.

I can understand being fined for dangerous driving or blatant cheating, but in most cases it is revenue gathering and driving young competitors out of the sport.

It’s hard enough without these ridiculous actions by officials, who should be being fined themselves for not following their own rulebook.

Motorsport has developed into such a professional sport in New Zealand, that it’s time we had some professional officials to run it.
On a happier note, I’ve just returned from the Historic Classic race meeting at Sandown in Melbourne, Australia, which featured a huge field of NZ and Australian Formula 5000 cars racing for the Tasman Cup.

I was invited to attend as part of a reunion of F5000 drivers from the 1970s, and it was fantastic catching up with drivers I haven’t seen for up to 30 years, such as Warwick Brown, John McCormick, Alf Constanzo, Bruce Allison and John Goss.

It was an amazing trip down memory lane when I was given the opportunity to step back into my NZ Grand Prix-winning Lola T332 for a demonstration run on the Sunday. It was the first time I had sat in it since 1977.

The field of F5000s produced an incredible display of sights and sounds that brought the house down.
Such a full field probably hasn’t been seen at Sandown for 30 years, and it’s mainly thanks to the work of the NZ F5000 association, and in particular David Abbott. We’ll have to wait until the new year to see these beasts in action in NZ.



We had a reasonable weekend in the Exide Toyota in Round 1 of the TRS. We lost our way slightly on Saturday, but ended up sixth for the weekend which was pleasing.

Unfortunately, the meeting was let down by officialdom. In what was one of the most dangerous moves I have ever seen at a racetrack, an official’s vehicle drove the wrong way up pit straight to attend a crash on top of the hill while race cars were still coming down at racing speeds.

Admittedly it was a serious crash, but it didn’t warrant putting every other competitor in danger.

What concerns me is the number, size and inconsistency of fines, sometimes into the many thousands of dollars, which are being handed out for unimportant offences or genuine mistakes.

I can understand being fined for dangerous driving or blatant cheating, but in most cases it is revenue gathering and driving young competitors out of the sport.

It’s hard enough without these ridiculous actions by officials, who should be being fined themselves for not following their own rulebook.

Motorsport has developed into such a professional sport in New Zealand, that it’s time we had some professional officials to run it.
On a happier note, I’ve just returned from the Historic Classic race meeting at Sandown in Melbourne, Australia, which featured a huge field of NZ and Australian Formula 5000 cars racing for the Tasman Cup.

I was invited to attend as part of a reunion of F5000 drivers from the 1970s, and it was fantastic catching up with drivers I haven’t seen for up to 30 years, such as Warwick Brown, John McCormick, Alf Constanzo, Bruce Allison and John Goss.

It was an amazing trip down memory lane when I was given the opportunity to step back into my NZ Grand Prix-winning Lola T332 for a demonstration run on the Sunday. It was the first time I had sat in it since 1977.

The field of F5000s produced an incredible display of sights and sounds that brought the house down.
Such a full field probably hasn’t been seen at Sandown for 30 years, and it’s mainly thanks to the work of the NZ F5000 association, and in particular David Abbott. We’ll have to wait until the new year to see these beasts in action in NZ.



We had a reasonable weekend in the Exide Toyota in Round 1 of the TRS. We lost our way slightly on Saturday, but ended up sixth for the weekend which was pleasing.

Unfortunately, the meeting was let down by officialdom. In what was one of the most dangerous moves I have ever seen at a racetrack, an official’s vehicle drove the wrong way up pit straight to attend a crash on top of the hill while race cars were still coming down at racing speeds.

Admittedly it was a serious crash, but it didn’t warrant putting every other competitor in danger.

What concerns me is the number, size and inconsistency of fines, sometimes into the many thousands of dollars, which are being handed out for unimportant offences or genuine mistakes.

I can understand being fined for dangerous driving or blatant cheating, but in most cases it is revenue gathering and driving young competitors out of the sport.

It’s hard enough without these ridiculous actions by officials, who should be being fined themselves for not following their own rulebook.

Motorsport has developed into such a professional sport in New Zealand, that it’s time we had some professional officials to run it.
On a happier note, I’ve just returned from the Historic Classic race meeting at Sandown in Melbourne, Australia, which featured a huge field of NZ and Australian Formula 5000 cars racing for the Tasman Cup.

I was invited to attend as part of a reunion of F5000 drivers from the 1970s, and it was fantastic catching up with drivers I haven’t seen for up to 30 years, such as Warwick Brown, John McCormick, Alf Constanzo, Bruce Allison and John Goss.

It was an amazing trip down memory lane when I was given the opportunity to step back into my NZ Grand Prix-winning Lola T332 for a demonstration run on the Sunday. It was the first time I had sat in it since 1977.

The field of F5000s produced an incredible display of sights and sounds that brought the house down.
Such a full field probably hasn’t been seen at Sandown for 30 years, and it’s mainly thanks to the work of the NZ F5000 association, and in particular David Abbott. We’ll have to wait until the new year to see these beasts in action in NZ.




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