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Big weekend for F1 at Italian Grand Prix

 

The Formula One fraternity arrives in Italy for the final race of the European season to the great Grand Prix venue of the Autodromo Nazionale Monza, the spiritual home of Italian motor racing, located in the outskirts of Milan.

The Formula One fraternity arrives in Italy for the final race of the European season to the great Grand Prix venue of the Autodromo Nazionale Monza, the spiritual home of Italian motor racing, located in the outskirts of Milan.

Very much a highly anticipated weekend for fans and teams alike, the 12-point title battle sets a new level with Michael Schumacher announcing his future and Ferrari, in front of their home-crowd, establish their 2007 driver lineup.

The Italian Grand Prix has been held every year since the inception of the Formula 1 World Championship in 1950, it is the only race alongside the British Grand Prix to which this applies.

Grand Prix racing in Italy began in 1921 on the 17.3km circuit in Montichiari near Brescia. The following year, the decision was made to build a permanent race track in the Villa Reale Park, Monza. The Milan Automobile Club started work on 15th May 1922 and was completed in 110 days. The circuit opened on 3rd September and a week later was inaugurated with its first Italian Grand Prix.

The original Monza track incorporated long banked sections, but safety concerns saw significant modifications, which included the removal of the banking from the circuit and the inclusion of a number of chicanes.

Due to the pace of the circuit, cars must be set up with the lowest downforce levels possible without causing stability problems under braking. They must also be able to ride the Monza curbs effectively and remain well balanced without too much understeer at high speed. In addition, good traction is important for exiting the revised Rettifilo and Roggia chicanes effectively and braking must be optimised to cope with the very high temperatures generated when drivers slow from top speed to negotiate these low speed sections.

Overtaking is possible at the first and second chicanes but the fast corners before each passing place make it hard to follow another car closely because of the vagaries of modern aerodynamics and races can become quickly strung out. These days, the slipstreaming manoeuvres of yore tend to take place only when cars on two-stop strategies have a significant performance advantage over heavier one-stoppers.

Autodromo Nazionale di Monza

Race Distance 53 laps
Circuit Length 5.793 kms


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