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May 24, 6pm News Round-up

 

Ford pulls plug on Fairlane, LTD

May 24, 2007, 6pm. It’ll be the end of an era early next year when Ford drops its long wheelbase Fairlane (pictured) and LTD.

The decision comes at a time when Holden has been heavily promoting its new long wheelbase range.

Ford New Zealand says, “a significant decline in sales of Upper Large vehicles over the past few years has meant that Australian production of long wheelbase variants for Australian and New Zealand sale only is no longer sustainable.”

The Fairlane nameplate has been an important part of the line-up since 1967, when the ZA Fairlane created a whole new market.

Since then Ford has developed the Fairlane alongside each generation of Falcon. The LTD joined the line-up in 1973.

Don’t turn us on and off, warns MTA

May 24, 2007, 6pm.  "The motor industry cannot be turned on and off like a switch,” complains the Motor Trade Assn (MTA), in reaction to a Government plan to impose periodic emissions standards.

Used imports that fail to meet the standards at the relevant time could no longer be imported, but the MTA says the idea will effectively put the industry into “periodic recess every few years, as and when revised emission standards come into effect.”

The association supports the principle of restrictions to achieve modernisation of the vehicle fleet but wants a smoother implementation method.

“This would have a simple mechanism of progressive updating, which would successively and inevitably gather up the steadily rising standards of vehicle emission controls being brought into newer vehicles.”

Britons give green light to diesel

May 24, 2007, 6pm. A survey by What Car? magazine reveals that in Britain most buyers are moving to diesel or alternative-fuel vehicles.

The survey indicated that 62 percent of respondents will choose a diesel and only 28 percent will go petrol when they next buy a vehicle.

About 10 percent will opt for “greener” forms of power and of that group, 60 percent would buy a hybrid and the rest would consider bioethanol.

 

 

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